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Glossary

Please note, the terms in this glossary may have its specific meaning in the particular context or subject, so naturally the descriptions are in no way complete in an encyclopedic sense.

Tonic

The term tonic, also referred to as tonic note or tonic pitch, is a reference to the note or tone, on which a system of notes or tones (called scale or tonic harmony) is founded. The tonic and scale together define the musical key used in a song.

All other notes or tones that are used in a musical key either follow, or precede the tonic. A scale begins and ends with the tonic. Multiple scales can be based on the same tonic.